The Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development

The Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development seeks to address the problems of persistent and concentrated urban poverty and is dedicated to understanding how social and economic changes affect low-income communities and their residents. Based in Cleveland, the Center views the city as both a tool for building communities and producing change locally, and as a representative urban center from which nationally-relevant research and policy implications can be drawn.
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CENTER NEWS

David Crampton Discusses Benefits of Pay for Success in Plain Dealer

Jan 5 2015

Dr. David Crampton, Associate Director of the Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development at the Mandel School, submitted the guest column “‘Pay for Success’ could benefit homeless families and Cuyahoga taxpayers” to the Cleveland Plain Dealer on December 31, 2014. Dr. Crampton discussed how the PFS program aims to reduce how long children with homeless caregivers will spend in foster care. This would both save tax dollars and show a more effective method to assist vulnerable families.

Partnering for Family Success, the first county-level PFS project in the country, was announced at a Chicago summit hosted by the White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation in December. The program started on January 1.

The Poverty Center houses an Integrated Data System that was used to determine the overlap between the homeless and child welfare systems in Cuyahoga County as preliminary analyses to identify the initiative’s target population.  The Center is continuing to evaluate the success and outcomes of PFS.

The post David Crampton Discusses Benefits of Pay for Success in Plain Dealer appeared first on Mandel School.

Nation’s First County-Level Pay for Success Program Launches in Cuyahoga County

Dec 4 2014

Cuyahoga County Seal 2014 revToday Drs. David Crampton and Francisca Richter from the Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development at the Mandel School joined partner organizations in Chicago to launch the nation’s first county-level Pay for Success (PFS) program.  The launch was featured at a conference hosted by the White House’s Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation. Cuyahoga County’s Partnering for Family Success Program – the first PFS project in the combined areas of homelessness and child welfare – aims to reconnect foster children in the county with caregivers in stable, affordable housing.   This innovative program will deliver intensive 12-15 month treatment to 135 families over five years to reduce the length of stay in out-of-home foster care placement for children whose families are homeless.  The Poverty Center is the independent evaluator to measure the success and outcomes of PFS and carried out the preliminary analyses to identify the initiative’s target population.

For more information, read the official press release and program fact sheet.

The post Nation’s First County-Level Pay for Success Program Launches in Cuyahoga County appeared first on Mandel School.

Claudia Coulton Talks Child Poverty in Youngstown Vindicator

Nov 14 2014

According to recently released Census data, Youngstown, OH has the second highest rate of children living in poverty (63.3 percent) amongst all cities in the nation with a population of at least 60,000. “Compared to other developed countries in the world, that’s a very high percent of our children, our future, to have in poverty,” said Dr. Claudia Coulton, Co-Director of the Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development, in “4 Ohio cities reach child poverty rates of 50 percent or more” on November 8, 2014 in The Vindicator of Youngstown.

“I think the average person doesn’t really realize how devastating the consequences of poverty are, especially when it’s experienced among young children,” said Coulton who added that the national child-poverty rate was about 22 percent in 2013.

Three other cities in northeast Ohio have child-poverty rates near or greater than 50 percent: Cleveland, Canton, and Lorain. Including Youngstown, all four cities are among the 14 worst in the United States.

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The post Claudia Coulton Talks Child Poverty in Youngstown Vindicator appeared first on Mandel School.